MiCBT Research (Selected Studies)

MiCBT Research (Selected Studies)

Research and Publications on Mindfulness-integrated CBT. Its been great approach to mental health professionals.

The Effects of Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT) on the experience of Addiction

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Submitted by: Kylie Wickham
Supervisor: Dr Bruno Cayoun
Co-supervisor: Associate Professor Greg Hannan
Institution: University of Tasmania, School of Psychology (MPsych research project) 

This randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT), compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU), as a treatment for alcohol and other drug (AOD) addiction.  The research was conducted on site at Missiondale Recovery Centre, a specialised drug and alcohol relapse-prevention service in Tasmania, Australia, during 2010 – 2012.

Thirty-four participants completed the eight-week treatment period; and completed self-report questionnaires before beginning treatment, after completing the eight-week treatment period, and at six-month follow-up.  The questionnaires measured:

  • levels of risky alcohol use; 

  • severity of drug abuse;

  •  severity of substance dependence; 

  • symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress; 

  • levels of mindfulness;

  • individuals’ beliefs about who or what is in control of their lives.  

All participants showed improvement on these measures over time.  Participants who received MiCBT exhibited greater improvement over time, in terms of decreases in scores on the Depression scale of the DASS-21, than participants who received TAU.  Participants who received MiCBT also displayed lower levels of severity of dependence than those who received TAU, across all time points.  Differences between groups on other measures failed to reach statistical significance, however an exploration of differences between groups in effect sizes for change over time revealed that MiCBT had an additional effect over and above the treatment effect achieved by TAU.  It was concluded that MiCBT is a viable option for inclusion in AOD treatment programs.

The Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Cognitive Functioning in healthy older adults: an EEG study

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Investigator: Caroline Bertrand  

Supervisor: Professor Jeff Summers 

Co-supervisor: Dr Bruno Cayoun 

Institution: University of Tasmania, School of Psychology (MPsych research) 

The aim of this study is to examine the changes in task-related cortical activity of healthy 60 to 85 year-old adults following a 10-week standardised mindfulness meditation program (in the Burmese Vipassana tradition) using Electroencephalography (EEG); Event Related Potentials (ERP) will also be examined. Training of the experimental group has been completed and the data are being analysed. The active control group has undertaken the Active Cognitive Enhancement program.

The Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Older Adults' Attention and Memory Skills

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Investigator: Cathy Bushnell 

Supervisor: Professor Jeff Summers 

Co-supervisor: Dr Bruno Cayoun 

Institution: University of Tasmania, School of Psychology (MPsych research) 

There is evidence that mindfulness meditation enhances attention and memory but the effects of mindfulness meditation training on the cognitive functioning of older adults has not been adequately investigated. If it were found that simple programs, such as mindfulness meditation training, could enhance or preserve cognitive functioning in older adults, it may be possible to also delay the onset of age-related cognitive decline. The aim of the current study is to examine the effect of a 10-week standardised mindfulness meditation program (in the Burmese Vipassana tradition) on older adults’ performance on neuropsychological tests requiring attention (sustained, selective) and working memory skills. The active control group has undertaken the Active Cognitive Enhancement program. Training of the experimental group has been completed and the data are being analysed.

Item Development and Expert Review of the Multidimensional Mindfulness Inventory

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Investigator: Arwen Dyer 

Supervisor: Dr Bruno Cayoun 

Co-supervisor: Associate Professor Clive Skilbeck 

Institute: University of Tasmania, School of Psychology 

Mindfulness has been defined “as a mental state[…]experienced as a heightened sensory awareness of the present moment, free from judgement, reactivity and identification to the experience” (Cayoun, 2011, p.1) and has been shown to be difficult to measure directly through self-report questionnaires, making the results of mindfulness-based interventions difficult to interpret.  The present study developed an item pool for a new questionnaire, the Multidimensional Mindfulness Inventory (MMI), intended to measure mindfulness-related skill sets by measuring multidimensional levels of human qualities known to develop as a result of mindfulness practice.  Items were based on thirteen skill sets derived from Buddhist psychology constructs, the Eightfold Noble Path and the Seven Factors of Enlightenment.  

Two hundred items were initially constructed and condensed according to specific criteria, ensuring good content (face and ecological) validity and inter-rater reliability.  The resulting 130 items were submitted to thirteen participants known to be experts in mindfulness practice, teaching and research for their expert peer review.  Participants rated each item and made recommendations.  As anticipated, five items per skill set with a mean endorsement score above 2.00 ("moderately endorse”) on a 5-point Likert scale were retained.  Inter-item correlations were often moderate to high and statistically significant, but considered as trends only due to the limited sample.  Additionally, there was a strong degree of similarity between all endorsement scores according to Kendall’s Concordance Analyses.  Retained items were re-worded according to participants’ recommendations and item development criteria, which improved content validity.  This resulted in a 65-item pool that future studies can use for psychometric analysis. 



The Efficacy of MiCBT for Family Carers and indirect benefits for their Care Recipients

Monday, May 07, 2012

Investigator: Ticia Glass 

Supervisor: Dr Bruno Cayoun 

Co-supervisorAssociate Professor Greg Hannan 

Institution: University of Tasmania, School of Psychology (MPsych research)    

Research indicates that therapeutic techniques involving mindfulness can result in health benefits for people with psychological or chronic physical conditions. The purpose of this study is to compare the potential benefits experienced by Carers who undertake Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT) with those who undergo standard counselling services offered through Carers Tasmania. The current study will help determine whether these benefits are indirectly experienced by care recipients.


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